Facebook Infidelity

  Researchers from Texas Tech University found that although process of coping with social media infidelity  have some unique characteristics, it can trigger similar emotional experiences for the partner who was cheated on as any other type of infidelity. The researcher compared “the experience of nonparticipating partners when their partners have engaged in infidelity behaviors on Facebook” to “the basic social processes that occur when discovering the infidelity behaviors” and the results indicate that Facebook  cheating can affect deeply the relationship, as much as cheating in person. The study used data from Facebookcheating.com. “This is very important because there is a line of thought that if the infidelity was discovered online, or confined to online activity, then it shouldn’t be as painful,” said Jaclyn Cravens, a doctoral candidate in the Marriage & Family Therapy Program and lead author of the study. Cravens says ‘the emotional impact for the party who has discovered online acts of infidelity is no less severe than acts committed in-person’.  “Facebook already has changed the dynamics of relationships,” Cravens said. “We see when our ‘friends’ are getting into a relationship. We say a relationship isn’t ‘official’ until it’s ‘Facebook-official.'” Cravens and her team looked into the patterns of responses from people dealing with online infidelity. Based on that, they created a model for the stages that people tend to go through. The model includes the following five stages: 1) Warning signs: the partner who was cheated on notices gut feelings and/or suspicious behavior on the internet, such as minimizing windows, habitually clearing out browser history and adding passwords. 2) Discovering infidelity: the individual either takes it upon themselves to investigate the warning signs, or...

The Gottman Method at a glance

I came across this nicely made, very simple, poster from Yes! magazine, that gives an overview of the Gottman Method of Couples Therapy. The Gottman Method is the theory that informs the structure of my work with couples. It always puts a smile on my face when I come across simple explanations for seemingly complicated things. The principles of this theory are simple, but practicing them on our everyday life takes intention. If there is something we all should know by now is that a good marriage – fulfilling, connected, satisfying – is merely a reflection of our interactions with our partners in every day life. How is your marriage doing? Would you say that both, you and your partner, feel connected, fulfilled and satisfied with your relationship? Think that if your relationship is not on the right track, leaving it alone will just lead it further into the wrong path. Here is the link for the poster, I hope you enjoy...